Gaijin on Getas Blog

Archive for February, 2012

Arima Onsen

Posted on February 28th, 2012 by Takako "Tammy" Ota

Arima Spa in Kobe City, Hyogo Prefecture is one of the oldest and best hot spring resorts in Japan along with Dogo Onsen Spar in Ehime Prefecture and Shirahama Onsen in Wakayama Prefecture. Arima is about one hour bus ride from Umeda (Osaka), the traffic center of North Osaka. It’s known as an oasis of Osaka and about 1.6 million people visit Arima Onsen every year. 

Arima Onsen

Arima Onsen

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Instant Ramen Museum

Posted on February 3rd, 2012 by Mike Roberts

 

Instant Ramen Museum

Instant Ramen Museum

According to a poll taken in the year 2000, the Japanese believe their best invention of the 20th century was instant noodles (the second best was the Walkman). In 2010, it is estimated approximately 95 billion servings of instant noodles were eaten worldwide. It all started in the sleepy town of Ikeda located in northern Osaka. In 1958 Momofuku Ando of Nissin Foods, introduced the first instant noodle dish known as “Chicken Ramen”. In 1971, he introduced the even more popular “Cup of Noodles”, an instant ramen dish prepared by adding boiling water to a polystyrene cup to cook the noodles and other ingredients.  Read the full post »

Fushimi Inari Shrine

Posted on February 2nd, 2012 by Mike Roberts

Fushimi Inari Shrine

Its picture can be found in many travel brochures, and it has even appeared in movies such as Memoirs of a Geisha. And even though it is only a short 5 minute train ride from the always busy Kyoto Train station, few people make the journey to Fushimi Inari Shrine. Often thought of as the headquarters of the more than 20,000 Inari Shrines located throughout Japan, this shrine can provide a quiet respite to a busy itinerary.

In Shinto, the indigenous religion of Japan, Inari is the goddess of cereal, or in other words, rice. So as you might guess, both the goddess and the shrines are very important. It is said the very name Inari, is derived from the words Ine, meaning rice, and Naru meaning to grow. Read the full post »