Gaijin on Getas Blog

Miscellaneous

Driver’s License in Japan

Posted on April 3rd, 2014 by Takako "Tammy" Ota

Japan has one of the best, if not the best public transportation systems in the world. There are many, diverse means of public transportation in Japan. We can move around by bullet train, train, bus, streetcar, subway and monorail. But still, about 90% of Japanese adults have a driver’s license. We can start to drive at the age of 18 and many people go to a driving school to get a driver’s license after finishing high school. Read the full post »

Arashiyama Monkey Park

Posted on March 6th, 2014 by Takako "Tammy" Ota

Feeding Time at Arashiyama Monkey Park

Feeding Time at Arashiyama Monkey Park

Monkeys are the closest species to humans and they are often portrayed in proverbs and sayings as stupid and incompetent. For example, ‘monkey brain’ means ‘stupid’, ‘monkey about’ means messing around. But are they really silly? Arashiyama Monkey Park is a very rare place where you can observe how monkeys behave, and buy them bananas to feed them from inside a cage. You can see baby-monkeys chasing each other around, wrestling with each other and climbing or jumping off trees. Arashiyama Monkey Park has come to be known worldwide since Tom Cruise visited there and introduced it to the public. Even though they are tame, they are wild animals. When you are in the park, please follow these three rules and enjoy the time with monkeys!: ‘Don’t feed them, touch them or make eye contact with them’. The entrance to the monkey park is near the JR Arashiyama station, and it’s about 30 minute-uphill walk from the entrance.

Read the full post »

Driver’s License in Japan

Posted on February 23rd, 2013 by Takako "Tammy" Ota

Japan has one of the best, if not the best public transportation systems in the world. There are many, diverse means of public transportation in Japan. We can move around by bullet train, train, bus, streetcar, subway and monorail. But still, about 90% of Japanese adults have a driver’s license. We can start to drive at the age of 18 and many people go to a driving school to get a driver’s license after finishing high school. Read the full post »

Money Matters in Japan

Posted on February 3rd, 2013 by Rachel Moore

With exchange rates, international charge fees, and money conversion, it can be very confusing to know what the best way to pay for things in another country are.  Japan is very much still a cash society and you are expected to pay in cash most of the time, but you still have options.  Here are a few things to help you be more prepared: Read the full post »

Luggage 101- How Much Luggage to Really Bring

Posted on January 10th, 2013 by Rachel Moore

It’s not everyday that you get to travel across the globe and visit an amazing, historical country you have never been to before.  Or maybe you have been to Japan, and know what amazing goodies there are to offer to bring back home to your friends and family.  Either way, we do like to shop and bring back great souvenirs, as well as look stylish while we are there, and (if you are like me) be prepared for anything that may come your way (weather, fancy outings, last minute opportunities, etc.).  But that may often cause a problem…there is only so much you can take (and bring back) with you!  Which raises the question: how much luggage can/should I bring (and how large)? Read the full post »

Convenience Stores

Posted on December 26th, 2012 by Takako "Tammy" Ota

Lawsons Convenience Store

Lawson Convenience Store

Convenience store have become a part of our daily lives. The convenience store concept was first born in Dallas, Texas in 1927. The Japanese borrowed the concept from America, but just as with everything the Japanese borrow, we made it our own. Today there are more than 40,000 convenience stores, and they can be found everywhere in Japan. Known as ‘konbini’ in Japanese, they are clean, brightly lit and very convenient, are open for 24 hours and sell a wide variety of products. On average, every person in Japan spends 1000 Yen (about $12.50 USD) at a convenience store every week, and purchase 10 rice balls from a convenience store every year. In metropolitan areas, the average distance between convenience stores is 900 feet (about 275 meters). There are about the same number of convenience stores in Japan as there are schools and universities. Read the full post »

How much walking do we REALLY do?

Posted on December 21st, 2012 by Rachel Moore

Tour Group

Tour Group

Japan is so beautiful, and you seem to see more, take more in, and get more of a ‘cultural immersion’ experience when you travel by foot and public transportation.  Another common question that comes up when people are considering our tours is “How much walking is there, really?”  We have clients of all ages participate on our tours, and all are welcome, but you will want to be very comfortable with walking and staying on your feet for long periods of time.  We always suggest comfortable, broken in walking shoes to use on the tour.  We take public transportation everywhere. So we walk to the subway and train stations, then we walk to our destination which is always nearby, but may be a good 10-20 minute walk, and we are often on our feet going through wherever we are visiting.  We do encounter stairs, and while there are often elevators or escalators around, they are not everywhere and not always available. Read the full post »

March 11, 2012

Posted on March 11th, 2012 by Mike Roberts

 Today, March 11, 2012, is the one year anniversary of the earthquake which caused the destructive tsunamis in north-eastern Japan, and ultimately caused the problems at the nuclear power plants in Fukushima. We at Samurai Tours want to take this oppurtunity to pass on our prayers and thoughts to those who lost their lives one year ago. And we also wish to pass on a supportive “頑張って” (ganbatte – meaning to persevere) to those who are trying to rebuild their lives, homes and businesses.  Read the full post »

Taishogoto

Posted on October 14th, 2011 by Mike Roberts

Serendipity can be a wonderful thing. In August, I was taking a tour group around the Jinya in Takayama. As we were touring the facility, we kept hearing the sound of stringed instruments coming from somewhere in the Jinya. Finally, we happened upon the group in the video. Read the full post »