Gaijin on Getas Blog

Posts in the ‘gardens’ Category

Garden Elements – Part 2

Posted on December 28th, 2011 by Mike Roberts

Ginkakuji - Kyoto

Ginkakuji - Kyoto

Paths

Paths are generally constructed of beaten earth that can be left plain or covered with sand or fine gravel, on top of which stepping stones can be placed. Irregular, flat stepping stones were used in the tea roji to guide the visitor to the tea house. Later stepping stones were introduced into other gardens. The most commonly used materials are slate, schist, flint and granite, left as natural slabs or shaped into more regular forms. In most gardens, stepping stones are of different sizes and are arranged in a variety of patterns. Read the full post »

Japanese Gardens 101 – Part 1: The History of Japanese Gardens

Posted on October 21st, 2011 by Mike Roberts

Koto-in

Koto-in

There is no doubt the Japanese have an extraordinary sense of aesthetics. This is evident from their traditional, colorful, silken kimonos to their trend-setting modern clothing designs, the stylized theatrical arts of Kabuki, Noh and Bunraku and their elegant but simple Ikebana floral arrangements. But perhaps this sense of aesthetics is no more evident than in Japanese gardens. The simple, minimalistic approach in restrictive, compact spaces belies the graceful results, making Japanese gardens the perfect place to contemplate the existence of nature and the nature of existence.  To the casual visitor, a Japanese garden may “look pretty”.  But with just a rudimentary study, the layers can be recognized and peeled back to lead to a more complete appreciation. Read the full post »